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of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is britain is open for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose:
july, 2011. up .5%. yields coming down during the session yesterday. employment numbers out of the u.k. in around 15 minutes or so. we'll keep our eyes on that. yields also -- treasury yields, 1.67%. gild yields, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's det
to allow them to pay minimal tax in britain. >> not paying their fair share, despite being over the u.k. on every high street. it's gisting behavior. i pay my tax, why not starbucks? >> sometimes they position themselveses in other country to avoid paying high taxes here and britain. amazon did $320 million in turnover in the u.k. it paid less than $3 million in british tax. all of this within the law but parliamentary law accused them of immorally minimizing the tax obligation. some say don't blame the big guys. >> i don't moral is the way we ought to levy our taxes. it should be set out in law and fairly enforced by the tax authority. individuals have their own moral compass that guides what they choose to do. >> starbucks does appear to feel the heat of public pressure. saying we need to do more. we are looking at the tax approach in the u.k. the u.k. said it will tighten its tax regime but it has not said how. other european countrys have similar concerns. with some calling for more uniform taxation across the e.u., so some countries don't become tax havens at the expense of others.
very cautious trading. we have industrial production coming out of the uk. if worse than expected, may get a negative q4 for the uk. italian yields are higher. spanish 5.54, just nudging a little higher. bunds down 1.29d% after the downgrade by the bundesbank, as well. draghi says we discussed it and again a big town great in inflation forecast, as well. some saying maybe they still won't, but it does knock the euro-dollar, 1.29d 25 is where we stand. dollar-yen 82.37. we talked about the yen in relation to what was going on with the earthquake. aussie dollar below 1.05. sterling-dollar just slightly weaker. that's where we stand as far as the european markets are concerned. let's get a wrap of the final trading day in asia this week. >> asian markets wrapped up the week on a mixed note. shanghai composite gained 1.6% and it's up over 4% on the week. stocks related to citi growth continued to surge as the new urbanization plan is aiming to boost investment plan. agriculture stocks up today on support policies. hang seng dragged lower by utility stocks. picc staged a strong trading debu
, if you look at uk they have a culture of violent games, the same games and everything around. obviously, they don't have these same shoot problems. if you like at japan, they have the most vicious, violent video games of anybody, and they don't have these issues. they don't have a murder rate. >> guess what? tell your hollywood friends, we got hundreds of millions of guns on the street. we ain't japan, so you fight the war on the battlefield before you and the battlefield before us is there is easy access to guns. there will be easy access to guns regardless of what gun safety legislation. >> to parents while i still have control, because you lose it as they get older, don't let them do it. find something else. it's hard. it's easier said than done because a lot of kids sit there for hours and it's their baby-sitter, but no. >> steve, i understand that's not your position, but i'm hearing this a lot of from people in hollywood. no response. quentin tarantino was unbelievable incense it actisen. what a total jackass. left wingers say i want to -- there's a slippery slope on first amendme
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
over to the delta brand. this is all about increasing its exposure into the uk market, specifically the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked a
week. that would coincide with south korea's presidential elections. the u.k., israeli envoys to the country in protest of the israeli prime minister's plan to build 3,000 settlement homes in the west bank. israel authorized the housing units after the united nations voted to upgrade palestinian status. palestine opposed the move. george hw bush in stable condition after receiving treatment for a bronchitissrelated cost. the 88-year-old has been in the hospital for a week receiving treatment visited by the children, including former president george w. bush. those are your headlines. back to lori and connell. >> thank you. >> sales numbers, general motors up 3% from last year, and others in the green as well thanks to, believe it or not, hurricane sandy. >> jeff flock has the story at the bureau in chicago. hi, jeff. >> indeed. two headlines. sandy one, and the other is fiscal cliff. starting to see the first impacts now in terms of considerations about fiscal cliff on the sales call today with ford keeping production up in the first quarter. they are bullish, increasing produ
potential for gaming in the uk. let's break it down. there is a one-year chart beard all things digital have been reporting they are close to launching games in the uk. plus poker, plus casinos. it sounds like a lot of fun. all things digital continues to take a look at online games and the potential for zynga doing exactly that in the uk. there is is up 3.25% right now. back to you. lori: great. we will see you in a few minutes. the bullet train traveling 186 miles per hour begin regular service. it previously took 20 hours and now it just take eight. in 2009 -- $640 billion is more than 139 u.s. dollars. here is to technology. tracy: eight hours is essentially new york to key west. lori: i would go like every friday. a christmas outage left millions of users without users streaming netflix. shibani joshi with this christmas debacle next. tracy: washington cannot agree on a plan for the fiscal cliff. we go to the nation's capital after break. let's take a look at how the dollar is faring against foreign currencies as we head to break. ♪ with fidelity's new options platform, we've complete
irish fan, so hopefully not. >> is dolmen all over the uk? >> that's correct. they're predominantly in ireland, but you look at ireland right now, they're actually going through the reforms. they're trying to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become th
. a project in the uk where we have good data, 100 million pounds, uk project, 30% more cost overruns than 5 million project. small is beautiful and more efficient than you think. so having the government, centralized one bureaucrat make a mistake, okay, massive consequences. it looks okay until they make a mistake. it's a lot bigger. plus, another thing. there's no skin in the game on a part of bureaucrats. bureaucrat makes a decision. that's the central thing. federalize the system and i was asked how to make the financial industry better. force people to have skin in the game. nrds, have people harmed by the mistakes. >> sure. >> you are not harmed as a bureaucrat, not harmed by the bureaucrat. a mayor, you're shamed. that's maybe enough, just a little bit that you need to force someone to make a good decision. you see? skin in the game and bankers don't have skin in the game. so one of the necessary rules is that those who make a mistake should be exposed to harm and not harm others, you know. that would -- we have known since -- once civilization started based on reciprocity of mistakes
in virgin. fill lebeau, what does it mean for both? >> for both? delta, more business over to the uk, lucrative business. we'll talk to the ceo of delta in a few minutes. rick santelli tracking the action at the c mulch e. what was it like today? >> it wasn't bad. we're going to give this auction a hook, an absolutely dead smack in the middle of the curve c. there's some strange inputs in this auction. $32 million yields a .327, which is exactly in the middle bitten off on wi. so pricing is fine. if you look at internals, a bid to cover -- to find a lower bid to cover they have to go back to february. if you look at direct bidding at 24.8, that is a record. that's almost twice 13%. if you look at indirect bids it's almost exactly the opposite. 22.9 well below 32% auction average and lowest since may of '07. we walk away thinking not so great. now that yield i mentioned, .327 is a record all-time low yield for the threes. after i sypher all that we come up with an average and look forward to $21 billion, ten years, early auction because of the fed decision. back to you, tyler. >> rick
the president is considering anna wintor, the editor in chief to "vogue" to be the ambassador to the uk or france. she was the biggest bundlers raising more than $500,000 for the obama campaign. >>> that's now your top news. you know what? >> i'm trying to breathe in and absorb the last story. all right. there is a new voice joining the immigration debate with hispanic voters overwhelmingly siding with president obama for the second straight election. the trio of latino mega donors including eva longoria are launching a new group aimed at mobilizing that energy and enthusiasm. the primary focus is to grow a strong social media presence and help the white house in passing comprehensive immigration reform. they see this has a chance to work with republicans who may be wobbling after losing a second straight presidential loss. >>> the secretary of state is denying she is running for president for 2016 insisting she just needs time off. michael bloomberg has another idea. according to "the new york times," blook called clinton to encourage her to run for mayor in 2013. the call reportedly t
, this is getting coverage in the uk. i have a friend in peru who had seen it on tv in peru, it's all over the world. mexico is on a global stage right now, and they need to do the right thing. martha: this is an ally and a huge trading partner of the united states, and it's apparent to me that all you're asking for is fair treatment for your son, and that he be returned on what you see as a baseless charge. >> precisely. martha: john and olivia we hope your son gets home in time for christmas and he can share that special time with you and your family and get out of there. and we are going to stay on top of this story. we thank you so much for being with us today. thanks to you both. >> thank you. bill: it's a tough, tough time. jon scott is coming up a couple minutes away, hospitals what is going on. jon: a new report from an independent group. it has a lot to say about what went wrong in benghazi. the tere owe attack back on september 11th left four americans dead, and it says the state department messed up big time. we'll go in depth on that. plus the president just about to announce the steps h
, no doubt about it. has dual citizenship between the u.k. and u.s. neighbor he believes, his dogs were poisoned by the neighbor who ended up getting murdered. i don't know. we'll see. but still no charges. tracy: sunday night movie. ashley: it is, it is. 48 hours will have a special in couple of years. as we do every 15 minutes take a check on markets right now. nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole, dow, at low of the day right now? >> it is under pressure. vix, fear index is so the upside. dollar is stronger. these things are pressuring the dow. we're back worrying about the fiscal cliff. i want to look a couple names hitting new highs, all-time highs, 52-week highs. start by looking at cvs caremark, farmsy health care provider this 2013 guidance is helping things along. they upped, raises the dividend with the upbeat outlook for 2013 that is giving the stock a nice boost. as i noted fresh all-time high for this particular company. we'll look at clearwire. everybody knows they have a deal already with sprint. now there is talk that sprint is offering t
. the boxer is extradiet add from the uk to face trial. he is accused of stabbing shawn long fellow. long fellow, a former marine was once awarded a purple heart. >> a multimillion gold heist. masked men boarding a fishing point on the dutch caribbean island. stealing more than 11 million bucks. the captain was injured and hit in the head. the thieves got away. serbia, ready and waiting for a vampire? villagers of one tiny hamlet believed that the legendary vampire ghost is aware know es. it is it home of the most famous vampire collapsed that. is a wrab. who will stay and who will go? biggest names in the obama administration will not be joining president obama for four more years. we'll take a look . shark. one man gets the surprise of his life while on vacation . v. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula kills 99.9% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains, cleaning in a better way than brushing with toothpaste. that's why i recomme
about violent video games and movies, i think a lot of us would agree, countries like japan, u.k. they have the same violent video games and the same violent movies the thing they don't have is easier access to a weapon like that that was used. why not remove the weapons? >> when you say remove -- adam: can't buy it. >> how about the weapons that are already in circulation owned by people? adam: i think that's going to be an issue. you can't make people give the guns back. but you could start to restrict the sale. that's the argument that's being made, isn't it? >> the way i look at it is this, give me the exact verbiage of the law and see whether that would have stopped lanza. i submit to you it would not. for example, he has weapons in in the house already. separate issue, he's a mentally disturbed fellow and his mother has weapons unsecured in the house. adam: i don't disagree with you. david: very quickly, how much would this cost, this kind of security? >> if you used former military, per school anywhere between 40 and 50,000 dollars a year. david: for the nation, tens of bi
. take a look at this. in the u.s. there are 100 groups. u.k., 200. europe, 500. what is going on? >> this is part of a growing global backlash against the wind industry. this is very successful portraying itself as green. we produce green energy, green lech i very, reduce co2 emissions. when you look at countries around the world, australia, new zealand, huge backlash in ontario, we're seeing backlash against the large wind projects going in all over the place. gerri: talk about new york. you have an interesting example there. >> just last month lawyers here in new york filed lawsuits, 60 residents in herkimer county, just north of albany, they filed a lawsuit saying these project, wind turbines, built within 1000 feet or so of residences are emitting all the noise, keeping them up at night, diminishing property values and they filed suit. i think it is indicative of the backlash. gerri: this is interesting. you say this is the first time it will be heard in court of law, the issue about the sound. >> in the u.s., yes. gerri: seems to me that is pollution. >> sure it is. that is
are required to pay less obviously in u.k. pounds. english homeowners are required to pay those back, but the u.s. institutional investors who purchased that they're based on have to pay their obligations, that is u.s. pensioners and other investors in funds have to pay those back in u.s. dollars. as such, the u.k. securitize her will turn three basic currency swap to effectively protect investors from any currency fluctuations in buying the securitization. that way the english homeowner gets their mortgage in u.k. pounds, but ultimately the institutional investor can focus on the credit and prepayment risk of the securities rather than currency fluctuations. historically this has been a challenge and there's been little interaction between cftc in securitization. rule changes and proposals have unfortunately created significant concern for securitization markets. first, posting a cash margin may be required for securitization for the most basic vanilla types. poor regulations may trip up in rope in many securitization transactions into those rules. first let me address briefly the gas margin.
at a situation where governments, just like in the uk, have to come one a support mechanism to make that economically viable. so i think that's going to be the saying across the world. that is quite expensive here in europe. i don't necessarily see europe as a whole changing its mind and going from nuclear. if you take germany, for example, why did they change their mind? obviously, there were safety concerns but probably more importantly, it was to do with the ballot box. there was quite a bit of opposition, people out on the streets protesting and in the end of the days, the politicians decided to take what i considered to be a political course rather than an economic one. >> i don't think we would describe it as positively rosy just yet. we're saying that the storm clouds are listing. but as you're hinting, there are big question marks about growth in 2013, particularly in the euro area where we're not expecting very much more than a flat economy at best. key thing for the investment markets, as you know, is that gdp growth is only a small part of the story. a lot depends on what
of with the british system, and in the u.k. incentivize with the preventive checks, blood pressure, cholesterol, urine checks and in the hospital, they get incentivized and rewarded. in massachusetts if the doctor does not save them money, then the doctors get penalized. stuart: and how do you judge, is it cost per patient per lifetime that the doctor is judged on? >> so what's happening here is that doctors are entering into contracts with insurance companies and they're given what's called a global budget. and they get a set amount of money to take care of a patient. if they look after those patients economically and save money they're rewarded. if they do not look after patients and spend money excessively and doctors are penalized and they're tracking it. stuart: that's interesting. let's suppose you've got a universe of 200 patients for one doctor. we'll give you x number of dollars to treat 200 people. you go above the dollars you're going to get penalized and come out of your pocket. keep below that number, the total cost of 200. you're incentivized and keep the difference. >> that's how it wor
the key here. 31 daily nonstop flights. that's all part of what goes between the uk and north america for virgin atlantic. the brand remains, guys. make that clear here. the virgin atlantic brand does not go away. what changes is that delta has a 49% stake in the company. there's going to be a press conference later this morning here in new york. we're going to be talking with delta ceo richard anderson, and "squawk on the street" a little later on this morning. but this is a big deal in terms of what's happening with the airlines, and that international consolidation that we've all been expecting. guys, back to you. >> before you go, real quick. how much is this going to really impact delta, singapore air, which had this stake, was unhappy ultimately, because they didn't have the control that they really needed. or thought that they needed. >> i think richard anderson believes he will have the control. also singapore airlines, many believe that it did not utilize the access to heathrow as effectively as delta will be able to in terms of flights between north america, and heathrow. so
're not being impacted at this stage. we are in the france, uk and spain and all of our businesses are growing in each market. we're hiring in all of those markets. anybody who wants to know. >> have you changed the mix of samples depending on the economic environment? for instance in 2008 did you have maybe a lower end price point product as well as a higher end or no? >> that's one thing about the beauty industry, trends are always changing. it's an accessible luxury. you've heard of the lipstick effect. when the company goes down people want to treat themselves. one thing we've seen this year is male trends. nail polish, nail art. >> carl loves nail polish. he just loves it. >> what are all those people who give out samples in department stores going to do when you put them out of business? >> they're doing something different. department store sampling and sampling in stores is a loyalty moment. it's not a great thing to do for customer acquisition. you still have to get a customer to walk up to you. we're doing something really different. it's customer acquisition and it's in a very targe
that will get smaller and smaller and smaller. the uk, well under 2. china, 1.55. we know they've actually implemented policies because they want to control population. in the bigger picture, fooling around with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a
that ruled -- i think is what will surprise some folks -- that there is a treaty that the u.s. and the u.k. are a party to, along with a lot of other parties, call the international child abduction treaty. and that treaty is what was upheld by the lower courts in the united states. so the mother was able to keep custody of the little girl. now the u.s. supreme court is hearing the case today and we'll see what happens. the effects of this, the impact of this will likely reach a lot of u.s. military. >> gretchen: recently in the news, there has been this american female actress who also had two children with a foreign national, i believe he was from france. >> right. >> gretchen: then he was able to take -- the judge in the u.s. ruled that he could take the children back to france and she has been trying to fight to get them back. >> exactly. and it's this treaty in the hague and it's meant to help prehave not parents from abducting children burks it seems like it's perhaps doing the opposite. >> steve: so the supreme court is not going to decide necessarily who the child lives with, but wi
if any laws were broken. >> who knows what the laws in australia and u.k. are? when i listen to those ryan roses things and that's happening live. i don't think they're getting anybody's permission to do anything. >> gretchen: you're a standup comedienne as well. >> my comedy -- i'm not a mean comic. i think if i make fun of anybody, it's myself most of the time. and i think you never know how people going to react when you're cruel. my father always said this, you never know what's going on behind somebody's eyes. and you tonight. you don't know what they've come into a room with. so look, a million times we've predicted the end of iron glee this country. i don't think this is the end of anything in this country. there are always people who are willing to go to extremes to get a laugh. i hope people will consider the possibility of what the results might be. this is something that will probably never happen again. it is a unique, unusual, very singular occurrence. >> eric: you're going to be on "glee"? >> i'm going to be on "glee"! i'm super excited. ryan murphy is an incredible tale
would publish to is pulling your strings. the great problem with america, like in the u.k., is not so much the tax rate, but tax avoidance. the last point that i would like to make, 35 years, it led to the biggest crash since the 1930's. the reason why the state is in some much that is to be bailed out the banking system. maybe we should tackle that first before the flat rate tax system that does not work for people. guest: from our perspective, we vociferously opposed wall street. i thought that that was the very moment that public policy was straightened out in this company. 700 billion bailed out bad actors in this country? i am with you on that. we need to clean out capitalists. let's go after all of those special deals in the tax code. bankers and unions, all of the year marks have been put in their. that is what the tax code is all about. but if tax rates go too high, taxpayers will avoid them. tax rates matter. incentives matter. public policy in washington, d.c., changes the behavior of people. host: national links, this recent piece in roll-call says that freedom works as the
spending cuts, a proposed tax increase on middle income workers, the u.k. immigration policy, and renewable energy. that is tonight at 9:00 on c- span. >> the white house is very controversial. there was competition to design it. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly our- inspiring. -- awe-inspiring. the congressman said the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> she has gathered a few of her favorite white house photographs. watch tonight at 7:30 on c- span3's "american history tv." >> a senate finance subcommittee hearing looked at whether a tax incentives and energy policy will promote energy efficiency investment and economic growth. witnesses included representatives from the national energy laboratory. this is one hour and 20 minutes. ahead andn't we go get started? today's hearing considers some proposals to promote efficient use of energy resources. the tax code has long served as a way to promote energy policy goals. most of this time, the code only offered
's grappling with the same question helped by some decent uk inflation data today. and a t-bill auction in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have the latest on not just the breakdown of this offer, but by the response of some key senators this mornin
is experiencing a mini boom, getting visitor from all over. >> people from the u.k., from tokyo, from australia, france, i was amazed when i came to work here how many people from other countries come to visit our little town. >> reporter: and their little town's population has now blossomed to 60 residents as clean tech job seekers stream into the area to see the solar installations and more rare earth mining which is being expanded in the nearby hills. >> it's terrific for me because it's sort of like i'm realizing my dream. and doing something i really like doing that is turning into a business success. >> reporter: and the nickname of this little town is nipton powered by the sun, and another unique fact is it's only one of two towns in the entire country that's owned by a private individual. the other one is in the state of wyoming. patti ann, back to you. patti ann: yeah. and that individual, freeman, he's done a lot. is he done, or does he have more plans for nipton? >> reporter: oh, no. he has big plans for his small town. he wants to put in electric vehicle charging stations, an organi
europe and people in the u.k. and throughout the world. my hope is we are going to get the deal done. >> we have three weeks or so to play with at least this year some say. is that feasible knowing what you know? >> i think what you have to realize is there has to be a down payment. president outlined what he wants for that down payment on revenue side. let's have rates go back up which was the underlying assumption that was included in the whole simpson-bowles plan. the gang of six plan embraced that as well. brought the rates back up to 39%. you could still do tax reform after that to bring them back down and eliminate the tax expenditures. that's a good starting point. will we fully get through tax reform and entitlement reform by the end of the year? obviously not. what i fear is let's not continue to negotiate this into the 11th hour. every day that we go on during this period, during retail season, you hold back consumers which we know consumer confidence is two-thirds of the economy. folks are not buying stuff because they don't know what will happen come the beginning of the
territory. so we're firmly in recession here in the eurozone and in the uk as well. we saw services pmi come in weaker than expected. contraction territory for new orders -- this is the british chancellor today. george osbourne will be delivering his autumn statement where he's probably going to say growth isn't strong enough so we're going to not really meet our budget targets as well. all these things coming into play at the moment as we wait for the u.s. session. we did have a good piece of news, though, out of china. the new leadership saying wle do whatever it takes to maintain solid economic growth. the shanghai composite up nearly 3% today. that boosted retail stocks. we also had a spanish bond auction, prefunding for 2013. got nearly the 4.5 billion they wanted. yields in spain. the ten-year did come lower on that auction, so not a bad result. and bid to cover was okay. so spanish yields slightly higher after that. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know,
for that company for autonomy. the uk unit of deloitte was in charge of signing off on autonomy's financial statements also before hp bought the company in 2011. but deloitte was also paid significant fees for other work it did for autonomy like due diligence work on a potential acquisition and to many observers the multitasking is potentially an industry problem. >>> let's take a look at stocks to watch this morning. we'll start with the first one, we'll look at enbridge which at this point is not doing a whole lot. it's indicated up 0.3 of a percent. enbridge has raised its dividend by 12% and it sees strong growth in its outlook for next year. next on the list which is coming up now is cooper. cooper fourth quarter profit rising 27% on continued contact lens sales. so, this is -- there's, like, six different coopers at one point. this is the contact lens. there's cooper tire. >> different one. >> cooper company, and cooper. >> dan, when you take a look at everything that's out there, everything that's happening in the economy, what's happening with washington, what's your biggest concern
encrusted ipad 2? that's right. two generations old. from the uk's stewart hughes. just $8 million. still too practical? check out this diamond encrusted blackberry bold for $1.2 million. to be fair i'm not sure they're selling that one anymore, carl. >> the 10 is still coming. maybe you can modify it for the 10. that is fabulous. take me back to the television. i assume it's only as good as the input you give it, right? if you play a standard dvd it is going to look like a standard dvd? >> that's right. it'll upscale blue ray and sony gives you a server with 10 4-k movies preloaded. it loans that out to people who buy the tv. >> all right. now the robot. did i hear you right? your face appears on the forehead? >> yeah. it's a little kind of a cross between fun and creepy. you can talk to the robot. see the person's face. >> definitely on the creepy. >> it's kind of fun to try to steer it around and, you know, i got to steer it myself when i visited the
, italy, france and the uk. this comes one day after a federal judge denied a request by apple to ban u.s. sales of samsung smart phone models. the devices in questions are the ones that a jury back in august say illegally used apple technology. at that time apple had been awarded $1.1 billion in damages. >>> the markets, dow looks like it will open up about $68 points higher. s&p up about 10 points, the nasdaq up 22.5 points coming on some of this news that we may be getting closer on the fiscal cliff. let's check out what's going on in asia. hang seng was down off marginally. shanghai composite up marginally and the nikkei up as well. quickly in europe, you can take a look at what's going on there. the ftse up about 0.38%. cac flat, and the german dax up about 0.5. >> the white house is proposing a new deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. let's get to steve liesman with more of the details. >> you're surprised, aren't you? >> isn't it happening. >> soon as they want it done they can do it. >> you said it this morning. it's a fictitious thing. we're going to show you the movement in just a
. and pervasive, they call it manipulation of libor by dozens of staff. the penalty was agreed to with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators. it is more than three times the $450 million fine that was levied on barclays in june. the second largest fine ever on a paid -- paid by a bank. it only was topped by the $1.9 billion penalty that hsbc agreed to last week to settle that money laundering probe. >> crazy thing that stock's up. it's leading the exchange there today because people had been expecting maybe a slightly higher fine even than that. three times the amount. it was supposedly taking place for five to seven years, 30 to 40 traders have left. pretty pervasive. >> i wonder how much they -- they make money or lose money after -- >> after all was said and done. $1.5 billion. >> probably lost. they did well. the libor stuff, if you can set rates -- >> well, and the crazy thing, it affects so many different instruments and so many people and so many businesses. >> right. >> i don't know that you could ever actually figure out all the implications from it. >> right. from everyone. and in a related
in the u.k., david cameron as well as the president australia. >> steve: it happened 23 hours and 30 minutes ago when adam lanza, 20 years olds walked into na school after he broke the glass out after he murdered his mother and shot dead 20 children and six adults and heard great stories of heroism. things that teachers and members of that particular sandy hook elementary school, the things that they did, a lot of them did the right stuff. unfortunately, this was a guy intent on killing. >> alisyn: we'll get to the stories about the teachers and the students there, but first let's just talk about who adam lanza is, because of course, everyone wants to know if there was a spark, a sign where somebody could have seen what was going to come. he's 20 years old. parents divorced in 2009. he's lived alone with his mother in newtown, connecticut and his dad lived in stanford and brother. and his brother 24 years old. ryan, lived in hoboken. he believed his brother was somewhere on the autism spectrum, might have had as perfecti perfecti asperger's. and he was a computer nerd and love video
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